Be careful you don’t add salt to the wound

Job 16:1-5 NIV

Then Job replied:
‘I have heard many things like these; you are miserable comforters, all of you! Will your long-winded speeches never end? What ails you that you keep on arguing?
I also could speak like you, if you were in my place; I could make fine speeches against you and shake my head at you. But my mouth would encourage you; comfort from my lips would bring you relief.

Job knew grief firsthand, like no other. He understood all too well that deep sickening pain of loss; loss of loved ones, loss of property and possessions and on top of all that, debilitating sickness. God had stated that Job was upright and undeserving of such trauma.

However, the verbal judgement from his so-called ‘friends’ was simply unbearable! When he couldn’t stand it any longer his reply toward them was a controlled rebuke stating that if the tables were turned, and they were the ones in his situation, his words would be comforting, uplifting and gracious.

Wow! What a lesson we can learn from the man Job. So often we jump to conclusions about what someone must have done to displease God: why they have no money, why they are having marriage difficulties or why they are sick. It is not up to us to decide what they may have or have not done, so why add salt to their wounds?

Instead, believe the best and be of comfort to those experiencing grief or difficult seasons. You never know when you might be in need of comfort yourself.

‘(Love) always protects, always trusts, always hopes.’ Corinthians 13:7

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